Having trouble finding a good paint contractor?

Here are 7 ways to help the experience of getting your home painted more enjoyable!

by Torlando Hakes

www.colortheorypainting.com

Finding a good reliable painter in Bloomington can be difficult.  In every industry there are many levels of skilled craftsmen.  Some are top notch and some just aren’t.  NONE of them, however, are perfect. Here are 7 things to think about:

  • DO YOUR RESEARCH. In today’s age the information is out there.  Look into reviews and references on the companies you are looking at.  Learn a little bit about their process so you know what to expect on the job.  Every painter does things a little different so don’t be surprised if they do things differently than you’d expect.
  • GET TO KNOW THE CONTRACTOR. During the initial call and estimate you have an opportunity to get to know the contractor and about his/her company.  Ask questions but don’t grill.  When you grill the contractor this makes them uncomfortable and less likely to accept your business or puts them on edge.  Instead have a polite conversation built on mutual respect. 
  • YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR. We all love bargains, however, the contractors who really know their stuff also know what it costs to run a business.  They don’t merely charge the dollar amount they think they deserve, instead they charge the amount they need to run every aspect of their business and make a consistent profit.  The companies with low prices are more likely to cut corners and eventually go out of business.  Quality contractors charge a premium price so that they can afford to continue providing excellent service.
  • TRUST THE PROFESSIONALS. One of the biggest red flags for a contractor is when we hear that a customer has had problems with contractors in the past.  Most professionals know that the other contractors were most likely not the problem. This says to the contractor that this client is going to be a pain in the butt.  The best thing to do is trust the research you’ve done and allow the professional to do their job correctly and in their own way.  Complications do arise ever so often but most contractors want to stay in business and care about their reputation.  If they don’t you will have found that out already through the first three steps.
  • BE FLEXIBLE. The greatest challenge in my experience with painting is the weather.  If a painting company does both interior and exterior the weather tends to effect both.  Painting absolutely cannot happen during rainy or cold weather.  The paint job will not last if applied in the rain or cold.  Because of this sometimes exteriors are put on hold, interiors are moved up or pushed back.  Its a juggling act that is nearly out of the control of the paint contractor.  My advice here is be patient and flexible.  The paint contractor wants to get your job done as much as you want it done so they can get paid at the end.  But when a homeowner is inflexible this often tempts the paint contractor to cut corners in order to get the job done faster.  But this just won't pay off in the long run.
  • WHEN THERE IS A PROBLEM. When a legitimate issue does arise make sure to communicate both with the workers and managers/owners.  On one hand, perfection is unreasonable to expect but on the other poor craftsmanship is just unacceptable.  Painters who follow the industry standards set forth by the PDCA know what is considered acceptable. Understand that every contractor has the legal right through their contract to fix mistakes and get paid on time and the proper amount.  The consequences for not paying are just not worth the hassle.  The best thing to do is to talk in person, come up with a solution and follow it up in writing.  Beginning with an email or text message always sends the wrong message and should be reserved for simple communications and for the passing on of contractual documents.
  • THE GOLDEN RULE. Treat others the way you would like to be treated.  It’s as simple as that.  We at Color Theory really value this idea.  When we paint a home we really think about the service we would like to receive.  We think about the hard work you’ve put into buying and building your home and respect it as if it were our own.  We understand the sacred trust of allowing strangers to come into your home.  That’s why we strive to be courteous and friendly.  Always trustworthy and careful.  Because these same character traits we cherish are what we hope to receive in return.